2. Pyoderma gangrenosum. This rash, which spreads quickly, is made up of red or purple bumps or blisters. They eventually join together and form deep open sores (ulcers) with a blue or purple border, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD).The ulcers can occur almost anywhere: “People can have them on their feet, making it difficult to walk,” Hagan says. “They can have them on their legs, or their stomachs.” Sometimes the rash develops around the site of an injury or surgical wound.Unlike erythema nodosum, this skin problem often appears when bowel disease is quiet, Hagan says. It also can be difficult to treat, she adds.“Pyoderma gangrenosum can leave terrible scars,” says Joaquin Brieva, MD, a dermatologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The condition requires sophisticated wound care by an expert team plus treatment for the underlying colitis.Treatments include medicines that target the skin or whole-body therapies, such as anti-inflammatory creams and steroid ointments; steroids pills or injections, which are sometimes injected directly into the ulcers; and medications that suppress the immune system.

3. Aphthous stomatitis. Also known as canker cores, these are white spots with a red base that are found in the lining of the mouth or on the tongue, Hagan says. Some people get them right before a flare, she adds.In people with Ulcerative Colitis Disease, canker sores are often larger than a centimeter and hang around longer than 2 weeks, Dr. Brieva says.Treatment includes tetracycline mouthwashes, steroid medications that are made to stick to the mouth and gums, and lidocaine, among other things, he adds.According to the National Library of Medicine, you can also try to:

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